Kayaking on Prince Edward Island

Today was the first official day of spring and it arrived with howling winds, a little bit of snow in the morning and torrential rain into the evening. But the sunshine is coming and the boats will soon come out of hibernation. I don’t hate winter but I do look forward to getting back on the water soon.

Here are a few images from last fall during a project for tourism. Isolated away from all traffic, life on the pond is incredibly peaceful.

Prince Edward Island Kayaking

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Basin Head Beach - Clear Water Sand

The Best Beach in Canada

Vacay.ca believes that answer is Basin Head, located (N 46 22.853 W 62 06.590) on the eastern end of Prince Edward Island, roughly a 1 hour and 15 minute drive from Charlottetown. This title of #1 has had the local media buzzing. Here is what Vacay had to say:

For reasons scientists are still trying to figure out, this beach makes a strange swishing sound whenever the wind swirls or when a visitor walks on it. Tourism officials on Prince Edward Island suggest the reason may be because of the texture and consistency of the quartz sand. Nevertheless, the sound is a unique feature of a beach that has some of the warmest waters north of Florida. In summer, the water temperature will top 21 Celsius degrees (70 Fahrenheit) at Singing Sands and other sandy spots on PEI, which has more than 800 kilometres of beaches to explore.

Why This Beach Rocks: Some of the warmest waters in the northern hemisphere. The supervised beach is in a day-use (summer) park that has a play area, food, washroom, shower facilities, and the Basin Head Fisheries Museum.

- Vacay.ca

Basin Head Beach - Clear Water Sand

Today’s Image – Singing Sands at Basin Head Beach

I have not yet made the drive to Basin Head this summer, but here is an image from the archives of this clear water beach on a foggy day.

Gold Cup and Saucer Race

The sounds of snapping whips and loud cheering crowds filled the air to a full house at the Red Shores Racetrack and Casino Saturday night to end a full week of harness racing.

Crowds gather at the Charlottetown Driving Park for the 53rd edition of the Gold Cup and Saucer Race. Regardless of what you think of the sport, it continues to hold it’s popularity. At least for me, I brace myself for each and every lap praying not to witness a deadly accident.

The following are some more images from the past few years.

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Past and Present Book Now Available

After several months of anticipation, I’m pleased to announce that in honour of the park’s 75th anniversary, PEI National Park, Parks and People Association and The Acorn Press released a new book this past Wednesday night to a full house at Dalvay-by-the-Sea National Historic Site — a 77 page picture-heavy book produced primarily with John Sylvester’s images from his 28 years of photographing the park.

During the creation of the book, I was approached by Parks & People and PEI National Park to participate in this anniversary publication with the inclusion of some of my own images which I easily agreed to.

Thanks to all who attended Wednesday night where both John and I were available for book signings. If I was a guessing man, I would not be surprised if we signed 100 or more books. It felt like a successful first day and I was pleasantly surprised just how many mentioned they were familiar with this website.

You can buy the book online for only $17.80 CND or pick it up at any Parks and People boutique / bookstore.

PEI National Park: Past and Present Book

Today’s Image – Prince Edward Island National Park: Past and Present

The following text is quoted from the introduction to Prince Edward Island National Park: Past and Present.

Prince Edward Island National Park has been welcoming vistors from around the world since it was first created in 1937. From the dramatic red sandstone cliffs and spectacular beaches in Cavendish to the pristine parabolic dunes in Greenwich, this small coastal park has captiavated the hearts of all who experience its serene and tranquil beauty.

Stretching for about 40 kilometres along the north shore of Prince Edward Island between New London and Tracadie bays and taking in the tip of the Greenwich peninsula in St. Peters Bay, the Park’s dynamic coastal landscape is constantly chaning as it is shaped by wind and waves.

This book aims to capture the essence of this special place, preserved and protected for you to return to again and again..

As an additional preview, here are a few of the images found in the book.

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